Goodbye Romance
awwww-cute:

Mine

awwww-cute:

Mine

dolltutorials:

trucetmuche:

First tutorial for the first Tutorial Sunday

How to print your own fabric Part 2. Great for doll clothe when you can’t find a pattern that fits your doll’s size ^ç^.

(I did NOT draw the images I used in this ‘tutorial’, I found them here on Tumblr ages ago but I can’t find the source, I believe they belong to Mibu-no-ookami on Deviantart but if you know for sure who draw them please tell me so I can credit them)

Thank you again! ♥

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure 201



Exposure occurs when the camera’s sensor is revealed and responds to a volume of light for a period of time. The goal of a controlled or “correct” exposure is to make a photograph that is neither too bright nor too dark. To do that, we must bring into balance 4 variables:
A given level of light
The sensitivity of the recording surface in the camera (ISO)
Lens aperture (regulates how much light enters the camera)
Shutter speed (regulates how long the sensor is exposed to light)
Because these 4 variables are inextricably linked, a change in any one requires a counterbalancing change in another. For instance, if the quantity of light in a scene suddenly increases (perhaps the sun comes out from behind a cloud), the photographer will adjust either the lens aperture to cut back on the amount of light entering the camera, the shutter speed to reduce the length of time the sensor is exposed to light, or the ISO, to reduce the sensitivity of the sensor. We call this balancing act reciprocity. In order to make this process simpler, photographers try to “lock down” on one or more of these variables, depending on a particular image’s requirements. The easiest variables to commit to generally are the level of light in a scene and the ISO setting on the camera, leaving only the aperture and shutter speed to bring into balance.



In the hypothetical situation illustrated on the chart above, the camera’s meter has determined that 1/30 second at f8 at ISO 100 was the correct exposure for a particular level of light. But as you can see, for this level of light at ISO 100 there are any number of other shutter and aperture combinations that will also result in a “correct” exposure. While different combinations will result in the same image brightness, they will offer a variety of visual effects. For instance, choosing a combination toward the left side of the chart balances a faster shutter speed with a larger aperture, allowing you to stop motion, but also resulting in shallow depth-of-field. The combinations toward the right balance slower shutter speeds with smaller apertures, causing anything moving in the image to record as a blur while resulting in greater depth-of-field. These are scientific truths based on absolute laws of physics, and until the age of digital imaging were undeniable. Luckily for you, in this pre-Photoshop module, they still are. 
To make shooting a little easier, digital SLR’s offer a variety of methods of automating some or all of the exposure process called Exposure Modes. Shutter Priority Mode allows you to manually select the shutter speed, which makes the camera automatically set the corresponding aperture. Aperture Priority Mode is used when you want to control the aperture yourself, and the camera then chooses the matching shutter speed. Program Mode chooses both the shutter and aperture at the same time by allowing you to quickly scroll through all of the combinations that result in a “correct” exposure. Manual Mode requires you to set both shutter and aperture yourself, “nulling the meter” by referring to a scale displayed in the viewfinder. Each of these exposure modes are responding to the exact same lighting conditions, but they offer the photographer different interactivity with the camera. Each can be overridden when necessary using the exposure compensation control for the automatic modes, and simply adding or subtracting exposure in manual mode. 
(big thanks to Shawn Read on this tutorial)
Post by Bex
Find me here: [Tumblr | Facebook | Society 6 | 500px]

frogmanslightschool:

Exposure 201

Exposure occurs when the camera’s sensor is revealed and responds to a volume of light for a period of time. The goal of a controlled or “correct” exposure is to make a photograph that is neither too bright nor too dark. To do that, we must bring into balance 4 variables:

  • A given level of light
  • The sensitivity of the recording surface in the camera (ISO)
  • Lens aperture (regulates how much light enters the camera)
  • Shutter speed (regulates how long the sensor is exposed to light)

Because these 4 variables are inextricably linked, a change in any one requires a counterbalancing change in another. For instance, if the quantity of light in a scene suddenly increases (perhaps the sun comes out from behind a cloud), the photographer will adjust either the lens aperture to cut back on the amount of light entering the camera, the shutter speed to reduce the length of time the sensor is exposed to light, or the ISO, to reduce the sensitivity of the sensor. We call this balancing act reciprocity. In order to make this process simpler, photographers try to “lock down” on one or more of these variables, depending on a particular image’s requirements. The easiest variables to commit to generally are the level of light in a scene and the ISO setting on the camera, leaving only the aperture and shutter speed to bring into balance.

In the hypothetical situation illustrated on the chart above, the camera’s meter has determined that 1/30 second at f8 at ISO 100 was the correct exposure for a particular level of light. But as you can see, for this level of light at ISO 100 there are any number of other shutter and aperture combinations that will also result in a “correct” exposure. While different combinations will result in the same image brightness, they will offer a variety of visual effects. For instance, choosing a combination toward the left side of the chart balances a faster shutter speed with a larger aperture, allowing you to stop motion, but also resulting in shallow depth-of-field. The combinations toward the right balance slower shutter speeds with smaller apertures, causing anything moving in the image to record as a blur while resulting in greater depth-of-field. These are scientific truths based on absolute laws of physics, and until the age of digital imaging were undeniable. Luckily for you, in this pre-Photoshop module, they still are.

To make shooting a little easier, digital SLR’s offer a variety of methods of automating some or all of the exposure process called Exposure Modes. Shutter Priority Mode allows you to manually select the shutter speed, which makes the camera automatically set the corresponding aperture. Aperture Priority Mode is used when you want to control the aperture yourself, and the camera then chooses the matching shutter speed. Program Mode chooses both the shutter and aperture at the same time by allowing you to quickly scroll through all of the combinations that result in a “correct” exposure. Manual Mode requires you to set both shutter and aperture yourself, “nulling the meter” by referring to a scale displayed in the viewfinder. Each of these exposure modes are responding to the exact same lighting conditions, but they offer the photographer different interactivity with the camera. Each can be overridden when necessary using the exposure compensation control for the automatic modes, and simply adding or subtracting exposure in manual mode. 

(big thanks to Shawn Read on this tutorial)

Post by Bex

Find me here: [Tumblr | Facebook | Society 6 | 500px]

Claire’s fancy-pants HISTORICAL FASHION MASTER POST

shoomlah:

image

So my historical costuming resources list from 2011 was less than a page long- I’m not saying that I’ve learned a lot in the past three years, but this list is now sitting pretty at a solid nine pages.  Whew.  And people wonder why I want to redo this damn series.

This list is by no means an exhaustive one- it’s a list of (primarily western) historical fashion resources, both online and offline, that is limited to what I know, own, or use!  It’s a work in progress, and I’m definitely hoping to expand on it as my knowledge base grows.  First things first, how about a little:

ADVICE FOR RESEARCHING HISTORICAL FASHION

  • Read, and read about more than just costuming.  Allowing yourself to understand the cultural and historical context surrounding the clothing of a particular region/period can be invaluable in sussing out good costume design.  Looking at pictures is all well and good, but reading about societal pressures, about construction techniques, daily routines, local symbolism, whatever else will really help you understand the rhyme and reason behind costuming from any given context.
  • Expand your costume vocabulary.  When you’re delving into a new topic, costuming or otherwise, picking up new terminology is essential to proper understanding and furthering your research.  Write down or take note of terms as you come across them- google them, look up synonyms, and use those words as a jumping off point for more research.  What’s a wire rebato?  How does it differ from a supportasse?  Inquiring minds want to know.
  • Double-check your sources.  Especially on the internet, and double especially on tumblr.  I love it, but it’s ground zero for rapidly spreading misinformation.  Books are usually your safest bet, but also take into account their date of publication, who’s writing them- an author’s biases can severely mangle their original source material.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask for help.  Do everything you can to find out information on your own, but feel free to reach out to people with more specialized areas of knowledge for help!  Be considerate about it- the people you’re asking are busy as well- but a specific line of questioning that proves you’re passionate and that you respect their subject matter expertise can work wonders.

Okay, onto the links!

image

It’s impossible to overstate the importance of getting off the internet and looking into books!  God bless the internet, but books are (generally, this isn’t a rule) better-researched and better-sourced.  Bibliographies also mean each individual books can be a jumping off point for further research, which is always a fantastic thing.

Remember- owning books is awesome and you should absolutely assemble your own library of resources, but LIBRARIES.  Libraries.  You’ll be surprised to find what books are available to you at your local library.

GENERAL / SURVEYS

Patterns fo Fashion books
Detailed, hand-drawn diagrams of historical fashion, inside and out.  Pretty amazing stuff.

Fashion in Detail books
Not what you want if you’re looking for photos of entire costumes- note the “in detail” bit up there.  Just a beautiful series, and great reference for all the little things you might miss otherwise.  The V&A has an amazing fashion collection, and it’s great to see them share it with the world.

image

Read More

urdnotdanie:

I had a couple people in my class ask me to give them some tips on starting out as a new artist, I am new myself but something that has helped me SO MUCH in just a little amount of time is WARM UPS! Seriously, I am able to draw not only up poses quickly but I noticed more accuracy and my lines are less stiff and boring. It’s super easy too and really doesn’t take long so I thought I’d share to you guys as well some really good starting off exercises I have been doing in the past 3 months.

Read More

powderdoom:

MAKEUP UNDER $10 REC LIST
By Kham

Hey there! I’ve put together a recommendations list of drugstore brand cosmetics. I figured it could be useful for those of you who might’ve just started experimenting with makeup, or if you’re just looking for new things to try. All of these products are under $10. I tried to include products that are relatively inexpensive, as even drugstore makeup can get a bit pricey. Hopefully this is helpful to some of you. Enjoy! ♡

Read More

eveningdreams8:

due to the popularity of the wings post i did i made a tutorial on how i make these :>

i will show you how to make something like this (this method can be applied to all sorts of wings so don’t click away!) :

image

they can be used as wings for your doll or as the ones i made for this tutorial for a costume (these will go on a dolls head )

Read More

mxtori:

businessinsider:

7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.

Click here to find out why these questions help you.

This is so important!

I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared.

Don’t be me.

allisonchinart:

Hey guys, finally made a tutorial. :D Also on the deviantART: [ x ]

This is simply me sharing some of my thoughts when going through a painting. My views and opinions are constantly evolving, so nothing I say here is really concrete. This is just a current update on some of my thoughts and approaches to digital painting. Hope you enjoy!

Feedback is always appreciated so I can make a better tutorial. If there’s something specific you see in my work you’d like to see explained, let me know too.

myramylove:

I don’t think I can do any of these.