Goodbye Romance
I love your art style so much and you are a cutie patooter. I was wondering if you used any guidelines when you draw or if it was all freehand. Your sketchbook posts always seem so neat and clean and guideline free. Anyway have a nice day~
Anonymous

starpatches:

Both! It depends on how I feel I guess, but sometimes drawing freehand takes even longer because I get stuck if I didn’t think about what I was doing. I do draw freehand more in sketchbooks I think because I find it a lot easier compared to drawing on my tablet, I usually do something like this for guidelines digitally, a sort of quick doodle first

And thank you!

your colors may be my cause of death some day (a compliment.) say, do you pick them yourself and edit them a little or do you completely rely on photoshop?
Anonymous

starpatches:

Haha thanks

I’m not sure what completely relying on photoshop would be (and I use sai like all the time) but yeah I just pick them and if they don’t look right I’ll pick again, then sometimes when I’m finished I like using the “colour deepen” slider a little because my colours tend to be quite dull

before/after colour deepen comparisons which probably aren’t that great though

this one is a little clearer I think?

beanboots-and-bows:

Fashion Tips

mybutthurts:

boygeorgemichaelbluth:

funoftheday:

Instead of caramel apples this Halloween, melt jolly ranchers in a 250 degree oven for around 5 minutes, then pour over your apples. Add edible glitter for the sparkling space effect!

this is kind of genius


I WANT SPACE APPLES

mybutthurts:

boygeorgemichaelbluth:

funoftheday:

Instead of caramel apples this Halloween, melt jolly ranchers in a 250 degree oven for around 5 minutes, then pour over your apples. Add edible glitter for the sparkling space effect!

this is kind of genius

I WANT SPACE APPLES

mohrigan:

How to make a sword with insulation foam
1. Copy the pattern to the board and cut it. 2. Start carving. 3. When u finish carving it use a sander with a paper sand # 120. 4. Make a hole in the mid of the sword to put a stick inside so it wont break if hits some or something, then cover it with gypsum board filler. (This step might take time since u have to sand it many times and add filler many times if necessary). 5. Details can be added with foamy. 6. Once you done with details put 2-3 layers of mudge podge and paint it and done!
My page www.facebook.com/m.cosplay

mohrigan:

How to make a sword with insulation foam

1. Copy the pattern to the board and cut it.
2. Start carving.
3. When u finish carving it use a sander with a paper sand # 120.
4. Make a hole in the mid of the sword to put a stick inside so it wont break if hits some or something, then cover it with gypsum board filler. (This step might take time since u have to sand it many times and add filler many times if necessary).
5. Details can be added with foamy.
6. Once you done with details put 2-3 layers of mudge podge and paint it and done!

My page www.facebook.com/m.cosplay

voicething-john:

jane

clowmaster:

I thought Apple’s fainting couch was a little ott so I decided to make my own by experimenting with enlarging 1:12 scale dollhouse miniatures patterns. enlarging most tutorials by 170% did the trick, I found the full 200% looked a bit too much. The rest was just replacing cardstock with paperboard, doubling up on foamcore and adding a few extra layers of card. 

Tutorial can be found here: http://1inchminisbykris.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/1-inch-scale-french-chaise-tutorial-how.html

I cannot recommend this site enough. So many amazing ideas that can all be adapted to 1:6 scale with some alterations. Lots of photos, really in depth and most projects are made with paper and card - no balsa wood or specialty materials required. Please please please check it out as this project was so much fun to make and Apple is certainly delighted with it!

Budget Lolita is Getting Lace to Fit The Budget

20dollarlolita:

A big part of Lolita fashion is about lace. It’s a commonly discussed topic from the oh-my-frills so cute custom laces from the new Brand releases to the really questionable lace on the Milanoo and friends dresses. 

Fastest thing to throw a good dress into the ita (which roughly translates to “so badly done it hurts your eyes to look at) category is to use the wrong lace. 

I’m not going to use names for lace today. I’m going to talk about the qualities of lace that make it something I would use or not. 

There are two main reasons why you put lace on a dress: Contrast and texture. 

Lace is a detail that we give to dresses to add visual interest, to draw the eye to certain places. To help take a plain bell-shaped dress and give it the detail overload that Lolita fashion relies on. 

So let’s get started. This is all from my personal lace collection, so you may have seen some of it in a past post. 

image

Here’s an overview of laces I would use. All of these laces provide contrast and have a pleasing or acceptable texture

Take a look at how they look together. Notice what they have in common.

image

So for this text, the laces are laying on, from left to right, black fabric, white fabric, pale-colored fabric, and patterned fabric.

The wide rose lace at the top (ignore the thin strand up there. It doesn’t know what it’s doing there) provides a lot of texture. You can see that on the black fabric. Everything is black or white. Nothing looks gray. The roses themselves have texture. The center of the petals are thicker than the edges. This lace is interesting to see from many angles.

I would use this lace on any garment where the rose theme is appropriate. 

The cream colored lace  with the flowers and the leaves doesn’t look very good on the black. The contrast is off. There is too much gray muddy color in the background. I would not use this lace on black fabric. 

But look at what happens on white fabric. Look at the detail there. The way the flowers stand out on the white looks really pleasing. This effect disappears on the blue and patterned backgrounds.

This lace is also thick, though it doesn’t have the variety of thicknesses that the rose lace has. 

One more thing to mention: Note how the pattern on this lace looks blocky or pixelated. Normally, this is a sign of bad lace. This is because of the way that raschel lace tends to look. In this case, the lace is made by the filet method, and it’s a different look of blocky. This is up to you, though. If you don’t like the lace, you can simply not put it on your dress. There will sometimes be lace that is totally Lolita that you don’t like. You’re the one making the dress. You have all the power. Exterminate the lace you do not like. Do not give it shelter in your dress. 

I would use this lace ONLY on white fabrics.

The ruffled lace with the eyelets has a lot of contrast (though not much balance in the contrast. Lots of white.) and it looks pretty much the same on every color. 

It’s made of cotton fabric with embroidered detail. That gives it texture and the eyelets in it allow it to have some contrast. 

Since this lace is opaque, I like using it on hems and in seams, and not on the dress itself. It tends to not look good when it’s not ruffled (IMO)

image

The very wide lace with the embroidered flowers  has a variety of textures due to both the eyelets and embroideries. 

It doesn’t look too good on the black. Everything comes across as gray. 
It doesn’t look too good on the white. The pattern’s lost. 

I would use this lace on hems. In hems, you have light shining through the lace that will highlight the embroidery. 

The ruffled lace second from the bottom has great contrast. Even ruffled, nothing loses its pattern.
This lace is not my favorite in this batch. It is thick but it feels rough, stiff, and a little bit scratchy. Un-ruffled, I would use it on all colors of fabric. I’ve used it on hems, but it’s not my favorite. 

The bottom ruffled lace has good contrast and interest. However, the pattern looks somewhat rough and blocky. I think this lace would look good on white fabric, but is usable on all fabrics. 

image

Okay, my collection of lace I probably won’t use. 
All of these laces fall into a category called rashcel lace. This is generally a lace to be avoided (though it is not inherently evil. But that’s another entry, using raschel lace tastefully). All of these laces are thin and flat. Their thickness is not more than a couple pieces of paper.

The yellow lace is actually something I’ve used. The multicolors give it contrast, in addition to the holes on the top. However, I would never use this lace on fabric that wasn’t yellow or white. Notice how it’s turning the blue strip a little bit green? Green is not a color I’d want in a blue and yellow coord.

I’d use this on white or yellow fabric.

The pink lace is interesting, because when ruffled it looks like a much higher-quality lace. When stretched out, it becomes obvious that it has no contrast. 

I would use this ruffled, on the hem of something like bloomers where it will not be looked at too much. 

The wide white lace shows everything wrong about raschel lace. Look at it stretched out. It’s not white-on-black, but gray-on-black. Ruffled it’s scratchy and boring-looking. 

I honestly cannot think of a Lolita application for this lace.

The red lace at the bottom  IS NOT LACE. I know it looks like lace, but it’s called seam binding. The lace pattern allows it to bend with the seams and it gives it a cute look when you look at the inside of a use it to help with a hem that’s just not quite long enough. This is a tool to be used on the INSIDE of garments. 

If you want to put it on a dress, fine, but know that everyone who sews is going to look at it and go “oh, seam binding.”

So I hope this was in some way helpful.
I think it’s more important to know what qualities good lace has than to memorize names of different types of lace. If you find something  mislabeled or on sale, you’ll be able to look at it and decide if it’s Lolita quality. From now on, you don’t need to worry about stocking up on lace and discovering that it’s not usable. Budget Lolita is not wasting dollars.

And remember, if you like the lace and you want to put it on something, but you know that it’s totally wrong for Lolita, go right ahead. Make clothes you love. If it’s not Lolita, it’s not Lolita. Put on your Lolita-inspired outfit, wear what you feel makes you beautiful, and fuck the haters. There’s never anything wrong with wearing clothes you like.
Just don’t go posting things you know aren’t Lolita on Daily-Lolita or they’ll tear you apart.

Go forth rejoicing in the power of the frills.

doctorcoffee:

pyroluminescence:

motherofcosplay:

Ever have trouble finding boots in the right color? Tried spray-painting them and ended up with a dry, cracked mess?A fantastic friend recently advised me to paint leather boots (and any other leather goods) with floral paint. This is a spray paint that is light and flexible enough to use on live flowers. Above are the Poison Ivy boots I painted for a friend, which turned out fantastic.
One thing though: Wear them while you paint them, and maybe stretch your foot around in between coats. I didn’t think of this, and while the paint did not crack at all, it started to split where the boots were stretched from walking. Next time I paint some boots, I’ll let you know if I was able to fix this problem.
The paint I used is called Design Master, and you can find it at Michael’s or Joann Fabrics. In the stores near me, Michael’s had a better selection of colors and a slightly better price, but that may not be true everywhere. This color is “Holiday Green.”

Great alternative to spray rubber and plasti-dip or bootcovers, and cheaper than leather paint! Reminder that Michaels and JoAnns both frequently offer 50% off coupons and will match competitor coupons and offers!!

If you have a light colored base and don’t have the ability to color the boot with a spray (like if you need to draw details) use fabric paint. It takes more coats but it’s made for things you move in like t-shirts and other knit material. I used it for a boot before and have worn them. No flakes. Also this expands your color library as well as types of finishes they provide.I’ve also used Rustoleum spray paint on pleather for the silver portion of my snk belt system. Wore it twice and no peeling or running. I did seal my spray with Mod Podge as well.Never use acrylic paint. While it’s fine on canvas I’ve seen it come back chipped from other cosplayers. Do not waste money on Liquitex Acrylic paint, it’s really not made for clothes and at $8 a bottle you might want to reconsider.

doctorcoffee:

pyroluminescence:

motherofcosplay:

Ever have trouble finding boots in the right color? Tried spray-painting them and ended up with a dry, cracked mess?

A fantastic friend recently advised me to paint leather boots (and any other leather goods) with floral paint. This is a spray paint that is light and flexible enough to use on live flowers. Above are the Poison Ivy boots I painted for a friend, which turned out fantastic.

One thing though: Wear them while you paint them, and maybe stretch your foot around in between coats. I didn’t think of this, and while the paint did not crack at all, it started to split where the boots were stretched from walking. Next time I paint some boots, I’ll let you know if I was able to fix this problem.

The paint I used is called Design Master, and you can find it at Michael’s or Joann Fabrics. In the stores near me, Michael’s had a better selection of colors and a slightly better price, but that may not be true everywhere. This color is “Holiday Green.”

Great alternative to spray rubber and plasti-dip or bootcovers, and cheaper than leather paint! Reminder that Michaels and JoAnns both frequently offer 50% off coupons and will match competitor coupons and offers!!

If you have a light colored base and don’t have the ability to color the boot with a spray (like if you need to draw details) use fabric paint. It takes more coats but it’s made for things you move in like t-shirts and other knit material. I used it for a boot before and have worn them. No flakes. Also this expands your color library as well as types of finishes they provide.
I’ve also used Rustoleum spray paint on pleather for the silver portion of my snk belt system. Wore it twice and no peeling or running. I did seal my spray with Mod Podge as well.
Never use acrylic paint. While it’s fine on canvas I’ve seen it come back chipped from other cosplayers. Do not waste money on Liquitex Acrylic paint, it’s really not made for clothes and at $8 a bottle you might want to reconsider.